What is REDD?

The basic idea behind Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) is simple: Countries that are willing and able to reduce emissions from deforestation should be financially compensated for doing so. Previous approaches to curb global deforestation have so far been unsuccessful, however REDD provides a new framework to allow countries that have significant rates of deforestation to break this historical trend.

Landholders clear forest because given the skills, finance & technology available, they can get a higher return from converting the forest to agriculture or ranching. That’s more than they can get from sustainable forest management or forest conservation. By paying landowners enough to compensate them for what they would have earned had they deforested the land, incentives can be provided for conserving forest.

Approximately 13 million ha - an area the size of Nicaragua - are converted to different land use each year.

Taking FAO's global average of carbon stock in living biomass in forest is 71.5 carbon per ha = 262 tons of CO2 per ha and is a very conservative estimate.

Assuming that 90% of this would be released on forest clearance gives a total annual reduction in emissions of CO2 of 1.4 Gt or 1.4 billion tons.

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The basic idea behind Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) is simple: Countries that are willing and able to reduce emissions from deforestation should be financially compensated for doing so. However previous approaches to curb global deforestation have so far been unsuccessful, but REDD provides a new framework to allow countries with significant rates of deforestation to break this historical trend.

Landholders clear forest because given the skills, finance & technology available to them; they can get a higher return from converting the forest to agriculture or ranching than they can from sustainable forest management or forest conservation. By paying landowners enough to compensate them for what would have been deforested over time, incentives can be provided for conserving the

forest. Much deforestation takes place to convert land to relative low return uses. Roughly 13 million hectares – an area the size of Nicaragua – are converted to land uses each year.

Taking FAO’s global average of carbon stocks in living biomass in forest (71.5 carbon per ha = 262 tonnes of CO2 per ha) as a very conservative estimate and assuming that 90% of this would be released on forest clearance this gives a total annual reduction in emissions of CO2 of 1.4 Gt or 1.4 billion tonnes.

Go Green is currently developing several REDD projects in Asia. The carbon credits generated could be applied to reduce the carbon footprint of organizations, companies & institutions. Donors & Institutional Investors are welcome to participate and we can be contacted at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

The Challenge of Stabilisation of GHGs

Stabilisation – at whatever level – requires that annual emissions be reduced to less than 5 GtCO2e, per year (0.8 t CO2 per year per person) which is over 80% below the current level.

Which GHG’s Are Important?

There are six main GHG’s that contribute to global warming: Carbon Dioxide, Methane, Nitrous Oxide, Hydrfluorocarbons, Perfluorcarbons, and Sulphur Hexafluoride.

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